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Planting Tomatoes

Tomato plant sales are gearing up all across the country.  Whether you visit a TomatoMania event, or a local nursery, it’s clear that tomato fever is running rampant.

In most warm climates, it’s time to put them in the ground (while coastal and cool climate folks try to restrain themselves a little longer).  Here are some helpful hints for planting tomatoes whenever you get around to doing it:

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Plant deep, use Epsom salts We offer details on these recommendations and more in this previous Gardenerd Gazette: https://gardenerd.com/newsletters/03-31-09_Spring_Along_with_Me.htm

Troubleshooting If you ran into trouble last year, read this post and plan ahead for common issues that arise with tomatoes: http://blog.gardenerd.com/2008/02/29/ive-got-the-tomato-blues.aspx The most important thing is to plant enough to account for your needs.

Will you be canning?  Plant determinate varieties.  Do you love heirlooms?  Try a new one that you haven’t grown before.

Some of our favorites are: Stupice, Jaune Flamme, Orange Oxheart, Yellow Pear, Green Zebra, Nepal, Old German, Black Plum, Tigerella. Check back as the season progresses for more tips on growing and preparing your harvest.

This Post Has 4 Comments

  1. Jennifer

    My pea pods are browning and ready to be composted into the soil, as is my cover crop. I will pull out the brassicas that never bore vegetables and add some compost for spring? am I on the right track?

    1. Christy

      HI Jennifer, it sounds like you’re on the right track. I’d put those browned pea pods in the compost bin rather than directly back into the soil. They’ll take time to break down, and since they will have used up their nitrogen, it’s better to use space in the compost bin rather than your bed for breaking down that material. The cover crop is okay to turn under, though.

      Sorry to hear your brassicas didn’t do well. Sounds like either temperatures weren’t right (cauliflower needs a cold spell in order to head up) or your soil may be low on Phosphorus and potassium. Do a soil test to find out and that will help you in future seasons.

  2. Christy Wilhelmi

    Sorry to hear that.  But I’m glad you’re growing so many. My record is 23, but I’m doing fewer this year. Only 14.

  3. Laurie

    Several of my tomatoes from TomatoMania were total duds. It wasn’t very impressive! I far preferred everything I got from Two Dog Nursery in Miracle Mile.

    I’ve got 17 types of tomatoes this year! Crazy… probably.

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