YouTube: Propagating Tree Kale

This one is for you kale lovers and permaculturists out there: perennial tree kale. Yes, it’s true. Imagine a year-round supply of kale that doesn’t fall prey to aphids in hot weather. Perennial vegetables form deeper root systems and require less water and care than annual varieties. When annuals bite the dust, perennial tree kale keeps going. The caveat? It lives for 3-4 years, then must be propagated from cuttings. You can do this, and Gardenerd is here to show you how.

Our latest YouTube video shares an experiment in propagating tree kale over a period of 4 months. We tested rumors and came up with facts, saving you time figuring it out for yourself. Now you can make your own tree kale plants from cuttings.

Propagating Tree Kale

Try these great recipes with tree kale:

Tuscan Kale Risotto with Mushrooms and Rosemary

Northern Spy Kale Salad

Kale Lasagna Beats Spinach

Portobello Mushroom and Kale Stroganoff

And if you don’t have access to cuttings you can purchase a seedling from Bountiful Gardens (that’s where we got ours).

Tree kale, a perennial vegetable with deep roots.

Tree kale, a perennial vegetable with deep roots.

 

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2 Responses to YouTube: Propagating Tree Kale

  1. Sheri says:

    Christy, I thought Honey was anti-bacterial. I remember when a friend of mine used it in compost tea and it was a disaster. I thought that was the reason. Anyway, wondering if dipping it in root hormone worked better than honey?

    • Christy says:

      Good point. I wouldn’t use it in compost tea (nor molasses) but that’s another discussion thread. Somewhere along the line, I saw someone using honey as rooting hormone and it stuck. Call it garden lore, I guess. At least one of the cuttings we dipped in honey took root, but as mentioned at the end of the video the more recent cuttings took root without any help at all. I’m all for simple, so no need to use honey or rooting hormone at all.

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