Field Trip: Huntington Herb Garden

Spring is a beautiful time to visit botanical gardens, and Southern California does not disappoint. The Huntington Library and Gardens is off the charts in May with flora and fauna. We took a visit to the Huntington Herb Garden after tea last weekend to see what’s growin’ on.

Beans begin their climb up a trellis as red kale bolts to seed. Old and new coexist in harmony.

Beans begin their climb up a trellis as red kale bolts to seed. Old and new coexist in harmony.

Perennial herbs including Rosemary and thyme form clear boundaries for this formal garden. Annual crops fill in the spaces in between.

Mustard greens and Queen Anne's Lace reach for the sky.

Mustard greens and Queen Anne’s Lace reach for the sky, overtaking the wrought iron well in the center.

The end of the season can be as beautiful as the beginning. Let’s get a little closer.

Queen Anne's Lace blossomed at eye-level.

Queen Anne’s Lace blossomed at eye-level.

The bees enjoyed the flowers of bolting kale and mustard greens.

The bees enjoyed the flowers of bolting kale and mustard greens.

We found a lot of activity among the critter set at the Huntington. Squirrels, ducks, geese and more.

Who knew squirrels loved borage so much? This one couldn't get enough of the blossoms.

Who knew squirrels loved borage so much? This one couldn’t get enough of the blossoms.

This little guy completely ignored us and focused on eating as many borage flowers as possible. He rolled around in the herb to his heart’s content.

Baby ducks nestle into the mulch with Mom nearby.

Baby ducks nestle into the mulch with Mom nearby.

Down the path, we found a momma duck and her little ones dirt-bathing in the mulch. The babies also ignored us, but momma was keeping watch.

It's never good when there's a bunny in the garden.

It’s never good when there’s a bunny in the garden.

In among the pine, cedar and juniper trees we spied this rabbit. Uh-oh. What’s on its menu tonight?

Artichokes begin to flower in the herb garden.

Artichokes begin to flower in the herb garden.

Back in the herb garden, beauty abounds.

Salvia and sweet peas provide food for bees and other pollinators.

Salvia and sweet peas provide food for bees and other pollinators.

It’s important to let some of your veggies go to flower to provide much-needed pollen and nectar for bees and other beneficial insects. This garden demonstrates the cycle of life and its beauty no matter where it is along the way.

Kale bolts to seed and will soon make way for other plants in the garden.

Red Russian kale bolts to seed and will soon make way for other plants in the garden.

Sharing with friendsTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on FacebookEmail this to someone
This entry was posted in Blog, What's Growin' On and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *